News

Jerome R. Singer has died

EECS and Biophysics Prof. Emeritus Jerome "Jay" R. Singer passed away on July 30, 2019 at age 97.   He became a pioneer in the field of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) when he and two of his students co-created the first practicable MRI apparatus (then called Nuclear Magnetic Resonance - NMR) which was used to directly image blood flow in arteries and veins.  Singer's career at Berkeley as a professor of engineering science spanned 25 years.  He was also an Adjunct Professor of Radiology at UCSF and helped to found eight companies.  Singer had published more than 100 scientific papers and two books, and had been awarded over 20 patents.   Memorial services will be held in October in Berkeley.  For information regarding the date, time and location, please contact singer@singersf.com

Bill Kramer to Lead Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center

CS alumnus Bill Kramer (Ph.D. 2008, advisors: David Culler and James Demmel) has been selected as the next director of the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC), a joint research center of Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh.  Kramer, currently project director and PI of the Blue Waters Project and the senior associate director for  NCSA @Scale Science and Technology at Urbana-Champaign, begins his role in  fall 2019.  Kramer has also held leadership rolls at LBNL, NASA Ames, and NERSC.

Valerie Taylor named 2019 Argonne Distinguished Fellow

EECS alumna Valerie Taylor (M.S. '86/Ph.D. '91, advisor: David Messerschmitt), currently the director of the Mathematics and Computer Science division of Argonne National Laboratory, has been named a 2019 Argonne Distinguished Fellow.  Distinguished Fellows hold the highest scientific and engineering rank at the laboratory.  Taylor, whose research focuses in the areas of performance analysis and modeling of parallel, scientific applications, was a member of the EECS faculty at Northwestern University for 11 years before joining the Computer Science department at Texas A&M.  She has collaborated professionally with Argonne for most of her career.

Kathy Yelick looks back and ahead

Kathy Yelick has announced that she will be stepping down as Associate Laboratory Director of the Computing Sciences organization at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), a position she has held for nine years. Yelick, who was also the Director of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) from 2008 to 2012, is the subject of an HPC interview where she talks about her time at LBNL and what the future holds.

New tech breakthough will allow drones to fly for days

Prof. Eli Yablonovitch is the co-author of a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) that describes a groundbreaking discovery which has allowed researchers to raise the efficiency of thermophotovoltaics from 23% (where it has stayed for 15 years) to an unprecedented 29%. This ultralight alternative power source could allow drones and other unmanned aerial vehicles to operate continuously for days.  The paper, "Ultraefficient thermophotovoltaic power conversion by band-edge spectral filtering," co-authored by a 10-person research team that includes postdoc Luis Pazos-Outon, details how a highly reflective mirror installed on the back of a photovoltaic cell can reflect low energy infrared photons to reheat the thermal source, providing a second chance for a high-energy photon to be created and generate electricity.

IEEE EDS Celebrated Member

Leon Chua becomes Celebrated Member of EDS

Prof. Emeritus Leon O. Chua has been named a Celebrated Member of the IEEE Electron Devices Society (EDS), an honor which recognizes "Fundamental Contributions to the Field of Electron Devices for the Benefit of Humanity."  An IEEE Fellow since 1974, Chua is just the 9th person to join this elite group, which includes Nobel Laureates George Smith and Herb Kroemer. Chua is widely known for his invention of the Memristor and the Chua’s Circuit. The award will be presented at the 2019 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) in December.

2019 DFIETI Scott Schenker Alberto Sangiovanni-Vincentelli

Alberto Sangiovanni-Vincentelli and Scott Shenker named Distinguished Fellows of the International Engineering and Technology Institute

Professors Alberto Sangiovanni-Vincentelli and Scott Shenker have been named Distinguished Fellows of the International Engineering and Technology Institute (IETI) for 2019.  They are among 15 professors elected this year, joining well-known experts from all over the world, including Nobel Prize and Turing Award Laureates. Founded in 2015, IETI is a non-profit organization that promotes the innovations of Science, Engineering and Technology across the world. 

 

Wymbo app seeks to notify students about events and opportunities at UC Berkeley

Recent CS alumnus Shawn Magee (B.A. '19) and Haas student Raja Riahi are developing an app called Wymbo to help UC Berkeley students navigate the campus’s many events and activities.  They co-founded Wymbo inside Berkeley startup accelerator SkyDeck as a discovery platform:  students choose what types of subjects they’re interested in and Wymbo displays related resources, events and opportunities around campus.  They hope the app will provide students with opportunities to step away from their smart phones to explore the Berkeley campus and community.  Wymbo is set to be released on both the iOS and Android app stores by the end of July.

2019 VLDB Early Career Award

Aditya Parameswaran wins VLDB Early Career Award

Prof. Aditya Parameswaran wins the Very Large Data Bases (VLDB) Early Career Award, which recognizes a researcher who has demonstrated research impact through a specific technical contribution of high significance since completing the Ph.D. The VLDB Endowment is a non-profit organization incorporated in the United States for the sole purpose of promoting and exchanging scholarly work in databases and related fields throughout the world. Prof. Parameswaran is cited "for developing tools for large-scale data exploration, targeting non-programmers.” 

2019 EECS PECASE Winners

Anca Dragan and Alvin Cheung win Presidential Early Career awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE)

Profs. Anca Dragan and Alvin Cheung have been awarded the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), which is the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government to scientists and engineers in the early stages of their careers. Established in 1996, the PECASE acknowledges the contributions scientists and engineers have made to the advancement of science, technology, education, and mathematics (STEM) education and to community service as demonstrated through scientific leadership, public education, and community outreach. Prof. Dragan was nominated by the National Science Foundation and Prof. Cheung was nominated by the U.S. Department of Energy.