News

Campus Reopening Notice

Starting June 16th, vaccinated EECS faculty, staff, and students can voluntarily return to their offices, labs and other research spaces in Cory and Soda Halls if they follow the procedures outlined in the EECS Safety Manual.  Building restrictions for non-affiliated collaborators, event attendees, and visitors will continue but be loosened over time. Cory and Soda Halls will open during the first week in August.  We are not hosting events or activities until we receive more clarity about regulatory requirements and are able to resume full operations. Most employees will return to campus on July 12th, and in-person instruction will resume for the Fall semester on August 25th, unless otherwise specified by campus. Please continue to check the University Coronavirus Updates and Resources for latest information.

Startup Trifacta gives customers an intuitive, agile new way of working with data

Trifacta, a data wrangling startup co-founded by Prof. Joe Hellerstein (also company CSO and CS alumnus--M.S. '92), is one of the companies profiled by Computer Weekly in an article titled "Silicon Valley startups aim to make big data capture and prep slicker."  Customers of Trifacta, which specializes in sorting out data and getting it into shape for analysis, includes the Royal Bank of Scotland, the Luxembourg Stock Exchange, PepsiCo, Walmart, and soon Google (Cloud Dataprep). Other CS alumni on the Trifacta team include co-founder and CXO Jeffrey Heer (B.S. '01/M.S. '04/Ph.D. '08) and Vice President of Products Wei Zheng (B.A. '99).  

Anca Dragan wants more human-centered AI4ALL

At the Berkeley AI Research (BAIR) Camp this year, Assistant Prof. Anca Dragan will lead AI4ALL, a Berkeley education program designed to introduce high potential, low income high schoolers to humanistic AI.  In an article titled "The future of AI needs to have more people in it" she discusses the importance of creating AI with humans in mind and the value of diverse approaches to the field.

Alberto Sangiovanni-Vincentelli selected to receive the 2017 IEEE TCCPS Award

Alberto Sangiovanni-Vincentelli has been named recipient of the 2017 IEEE TCCPS (Technical Committee on CyberPhysical Systems) Technical Achievement Award. This award recognizes significant and sustained contributions to the cyber-physical system (CPS) community based on the impact of high-quality research made by the awardee throughout their lifetime. Prof. Alberto Sangiovanni-Vincentelli 's research interests are in design methodologies and tools for wireless sensor networks, embedded systems, hybrid systems, cyber physical systems (CPS), Systems of Systems (SoS) and electronic design automation.

Prof. Kenneth Mei has passed away

EECS Prof. Emeritus Kenneth K. Mei, innovator in computational electromagnetics, passed away on Feb 16, 2017 at the age of 84.  Prof. Mei was born in China, served as an interpreter during the Korean War, earned his degrees at the University of Wisconsin, and joined the EECS department in 1962.  Prof. Mei’s work on formulating Maxwell’s equations into integral equations, now known as the “method of moments,” is one of the most important and widely used numerical techniques for analyzing scattering, antenna and microstrip circuit problems. He invented the superabsorption method in 1989 and the measured equation of invariance (MEI) in 1992. The MEI method made it possible for personal computers to handle problems previously only resolvable by a supercomputer.  Prof. Mei retired in 1994.

A new understanding of the world through grassroots Data Science education

Vani Mandava, the Director of Data Science at Microsoft Research, has written an article about the innovative course Foundations of Data Science taught by CS Assistant Teaching Prof. John DeNero and Ani Adhikari, a Teaching Professor in the Department of Statistics.  Mandava examines the motives and experiences of the students, and describes the aim of Berkeley’s Data Science Education Program (supported in part by Microsoft) to make data science an integral feature of a liberal education and a core interdisciplinary capacity available to all Berkeley undergraduates.

Anca Dragan and Yoky Matsuoka are taking charge in 2017

CS Assistant Prof. Anca Dragan and EECS alumna Yoky Matsuoka (B.S. '93) are among Interesting Engineering's "17 Awesome Women Engineers" who are revolutionizing the engineering field in 2017.  Anca is described as "one of the rising stars of the robotics scene" as the head of the InterACT Lab at UC Berkeley which specializes in human/robotics interactions, algorithms and compatible artificial intelligence systems."  Yoky is "a hot commodity among major tech companies" as the CTO of Alphabet Nest.

Ruzena Bajcsy and Robert Matthew are developing exoskeleton assistive devices for the people

Prof. Ruzena Bajcsy and EECS alumus student (now post doc in the HART Lab)  Robert Matthew (M.S. EE '15) are featured in a Berkeley Research article titled “Engineering to Restore Power to the People”. Supported by the Signature’s Innovation Fellows Program, Matthew and Prof. Bajcsy have developed mathematical models of the body allowing for measurement of upper and lower limb movement. This provides the foundation for wearable assistive devices to serve a range of physical limitations. With teams of undergraduate students, they fabricate lightweight exoskeletons and strap them onto volunteers to test their effectiveness. Their goal is to make assistive devices as lightweight and inexpensive as possible using commercially available parts and 3-D printing.

"Sweat sensor" tracks physiological changes from moment to moment

2016-17 Bakar Fellow Prof. Ali Javey is profiled in a Berkeley Research article titled "Physiological Changes Tracked Moment to Moment," in which he discusses his research into a network of sensors that can be embedded into a sweatband to monitor moment-by-moment changes in electrolytes and metabolites.  Prof. Javey is refining the sensor fabrication process to make it more commercially practical for fitness training, athletics, health diagnostics and even large-scale population studies.

Avideh Zakhor featured in interview by bigthink.com

Prof. Avideh Zakhor is featured in a video interview by bigthink.com titled “Smart Tech: Phones, Drones and Interior Mapping”. Prof. Zakhor’s research interests include digital signal processing and its applications to 2D and 3D image and video processing, and communications. Applications of her research range from helping emergency rescue teams navigate in times of crisis, to boosting our comfort with Smart Homes.