News

Shruti Agarwal and Hany Farid use facial quirks to unmask ‘deepfakes’

CS graduate student Shruti Agarwal and her thesis advisor Prof. Hany Farid have created a new weapon in the war against "deepfakes," the hyper-realistic AI-generated videos of people appearing to say and do things they never actually said or did.  The new forensic technique, which uses the subtle characteristics of how a person speaks to recognize whether a new video of that individual is real, was presented this week at the Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition conference in Long Beach.  “The basic idea is we can build these soft biometric models of various world leaders, such as 2020 presidential candidates," said Farid, "and then as the videos start to break, for example, we can analyze them and try to determine if we think they are real or not.”

Alexei Efros helps build tool to detect facial manipulation in Adobe PhotoShop

CS Prof. Alexei "Alyosha" Efros has teamed up with student researcher Sheng-Yu Wang and postdoc Andrew Owens, as well as Adobe researchers Richard Zhang and Oliver Wang, to develop a method for detecting and reversing edits to images made using Adobe Photoshop’s Face Aware Liquify feature--a popular tool for adjusting facial features, including making adjustments to facial expressions.  While still in its early stages, this collaboration to train a convolutional neural network (CNN) is part of a broader effort across Adobe to better detect image, video, audio and document manipulations, as well as a step toward democratizing image forensics.

Michael Lieberman wins 2020 IEEE Marie Sklodowska-Curie Award

EE Prof. Michael Lieberman has won the 2020 IEEE Marie Sklodowska-Curie Award for outstanding contributions to the field of nuclear and plasma sciences and engineering.  This IEEE-level Technical Field Award is the highest honor administered by the Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society.  Lieberman was cited “For groundbreaking research and sustained intellectual leadership in the physics of low-temperature plasmas and their application.”  Prof. Ned Birdsall (1925-2012) won the inaugural award in 2011, making Berkeley EECS the only institution to have won two of these awards.

Raluca Ada Popa Named an MIT Technology Review 2019 Innovator Under 35

Today, the MIT Technology Review announced Raluca Ada Popa has been named to MIT Technology Review’s prestigious annual list of Innovators Under 35 as a Visionary. Every year, the world-renowned media company has recognized a list of exceptionally talented technologists whose work has great potential to transform the world.

Prof. Popa is a co-founder of the RISELab where she is developing a learning and analytics framework that can run on encrypted data.

Gideon Lichfield, editor-in-chief of MIT Technology Review, said: “MIT Technology Review’s annual Innovators Under 35 list is a chance for us to honor the outstanding people behind the breakthrough technologies of the year that have the potential to disrupt our lives. These profiles offer a glimpse into what the face of technology looks like today as well as in the future.”

Joseph Gonzalez: at the intersection of machine learning and data systems

EECS Assistant Prof. Joseph Gonzalez is the focus of a profile for the Association for Computing Machinery's "People of ACM" series.  Gonzalez, who works at the intersection of machine learning and data systems, desribes how and why his field has grown over time, where it might be heading, and what challenges might need to be addressed in the future.  "Today progress is largely limited by creativity and our budget for compute resources and data," he says. "Machine learning frameworks...provide the necessary abstractions to hide the complexity of differentiation, optimization, and parallel computation, freeing the modern data scientist to focus on the learning problem. These frameworks build on advances in data systems and scientific computing to unlock new parallel hardware."

Berkeley paper wins 2018 IEEE EDS George E. Smith Award

"Improved Subthreshold Swing and Short Channel Effect in FDSOI n-Channel Negative Capacitance Field Effect Transistors," has won the 2018 IEEE Electron Devices Society (EDS) George E. Smith Award.  The paper was co-authored by current postdoc Korok Chatterjee, graduate student Ava J. Tan, former postdocs Daewoong Kwon,  Angada B. Sachid, Ajay K. Yadav and Hong Zhou, EE Profs. Chenming Hu and Sayeef Salahuddin, and LBNL's Roberto dos Reis. The award recognizes the best paper appearing in a fast turn around archival publication of the IEEE Electron Devices Society, targeted to IEEE Electron Device Letters.

Alexei Efros, Ren Ng and Kameshwar Poolla win EECS outstanding teaching awards

The winners of the 2019 EECS teaching awards have been announced:  Alexei Efros has won the Diane S. McEntyre Award for Excellence in Teaching Computer Science "for captivating lectures and engaging teaching in computer vision courses;"  Ren Ng has won the Jim and Donna Gray Faculty Award for Undergraduate Teaching "for exceptionally inspiring and engaging teaching in computer graphics courses;" and Kameshwar Poolla has won the Electrical Engineering Award for Outstanding Teaching "for outstanding lectures and inspiring mentorship of undergraduates and graduate students."  We are fortunate to have such dedicated and talented faculty to define the character of the EECS department and guide the future of their fields.

Introducing the newest members of the EE faculty: Boubacar Kanté and Sophia Shao

Two new Electrical Engineering faculty are joining the EECS department in 2019:   Associate Prof. Boubacar Kanté joined the department in January.  His multidisciplinary research interests are in the areas of wave-matter interaction, from microwave to optics and related fields such as nanophotonics, nanoscale photon management, and biophysics.  Assistant Prof. Sophia Shao will be joining the EECS department in July.  Her research interests are in the area of computer architecture, with a special focus on specialized accelerator, heterogeneous architecture, and agile VLSI design methodology.

Rikky Muller and Ren Ng named 2019 Hellman Faculty Fellows

Assistant Profs. Rikky Muller (EE) and Ren Ng (CS) have been selected to receive awards from the Hellman Faculty Fellows Fund.  The fund supports "substantially the research of promising assistant professors who show capacity for great distinction in their research."   Muller won for "Networks of Neural Dust" and Ng won for "Oz Vision:  New Principles for Color Display, and An Experimental Platform for Neuroscience."

Alvin Cheung wins 2019 ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Award

Assistant Prof. Alvin Cheung has won an Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Special Interest Group on Software Engineering (SIGSOFT) Distinguished Paper Award at the 2019 International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE).  The paper, titled "View-Centric Performance Optimization for Database-Backed Web Applications," was co-authored by his student at the University of Washington, Cong Yan, and colleagues at the University of Chicago: Junwen Yang, Chengcheng Wan, and Shan Lu.