News

prof. david wagner

David Wagner receives ACM SIGSAC 2016 Outstanding Innovation Award

Prof. David Wagner has won the ACM Special Interest Group on Security, Audit and Control (SIGSAC) 2016 Outstanding Innovation Award. This award is given for outstanding and innovative technical contributions to the field of computer and communication security that have had lasting impact in furthering or understanding the theory or development of secure systems. Prof. Wagner is recognized "For innovative research in systems security, software security, and cryptography that has inspired research in sandboxing, static analysis for security, and cryptanalysis."

Prof. Chenming Hu

Chenming Hu elected as a member of the 2017 Silicon Valley Engineering Hall of Fame

Prof. Chenming Hu has been elected to be inducted into the 2017 Silicon Valley Engineering Hall of Fame by the Silicon Valley Engineering Council (SVEC). Hall of Fame members are selected based on demonstration of significant engineering or technical achievements, provided significant guidance in new and developing fields of engineering-based technology, and/or has managed or directed an organization making noteworthy contributions in design, manufacturing, production or service through the uses of engineering principles and applications. Hall of fame members represent the cream of the crop of the Valley and, and counts among its membership people like Gordon Moore, William Hewlett and David Packard in addition to our esteemed colleagues Paul Gray, Dave Hodges, Lotfi Zadeh, David Paterson, and Ernie Kuh.

Colleen Lewis looks at social justice and equity within CS

Alumna Prof. Colleen Lewis (EECS B.S. '05/CS M.S. '09), now teaching at Harvey Mudd College, is profiled in an article about the award-winning women attending the 2016 Grace Hopper Conference.  Colleen won the 2016 Denise Denton Emerging Leader ABIE Award for young tenure-track faculty doing research involving engineering or physical sciences, who positively influence and promote diversity.  Colleen created CSTeachingTips.org, a National Science Foundation funded website that offers tips for teaching computer science.

professor edward lee

Edward Lee receives IEEE Technical Committee on Real-Time Systems Outstanding Technical Achievement and Leadership Award

Prof. Edward Lee has been selected to receive the IEEE Technical Committee on Real-Time Systems Outstanding Technical Achievement and Leadership Award. This award is given to recognize individuals for their outstanding technical achievement and leadership. Prof. Lee’s current research interests center on design, modeling, and analysis of embedded, real-time computational systems. He is the Director of the nine-university TerraSwarm Research Center, a director of the Berkeley Center for Hybrid and Embedded Software Systems (CHESS), and the Director of the Berkeley Ptolemy Project.

Vidya Ganapati wins CITRIS Athena Early Career Award

EECS alumna Vidya Ganapati (M.S.'12, Ph.D.'15) has won the CITRIS Athena Early Career Award, recognizing the accomplishments of technology leaders and organizations fostering interest in computer science for the next generation of women and girls. Vidya has demonstrated a range of research accomplishments, including applications in solar cells for energy efficient electronics and advanced imaging for surgical robotics. She completed predoctoral research at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and currently works for Verily Life Sciences. She has been active in teaching and mentoring girls and young women through programs such as Girls Who Code, Science Club for Girls, and the Girls in Engineering summer camp.

professor ruzena bajcsy

Ruzena Bajcsy awarded NAE Simon Ramo Founders Award

Prof. Ruzena Bajcsy has been awarded the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Simon Ramo Founders Award. This award acknowledges outstanding professional, educational, and personal achievements to the benefit of society. Prof. Bajcsy has led pioneering research in electrical and computing engineering for nearly 50 years, and is honored for two groundbreaking contributions: active perception, the basic principle and methodology that combines sensing and perception with the control of sensors to build intelligent robots; and computational anatomy, the discipline that has enabled many exciting developments in medical imaging that have clinical and research applications. The impact of her work has spread far beyond the lab, spanning scientific, engineering, and health fields. Bajcsy has also been responsible for the establishment of significant institutions that promote STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) education. She is the second woman to receive the Simon Ramo Founders Award.

Alexandria Finley's graceful pas de deux of ballet and EECS

EECS sophomore Alexandria Finley has been selected to compete in the 2016 Genée International Ballet Competition as one of the 10 participants sponsored by the Royal Academy of Dance.  One hundred dancers will compete over 10 days this December in Sydney, Australia, at the Genée,  one of the most prestigious ballet competitions in the world.  Alexandria describes how she balances her passions for dance, computer science, and physics in an interview with Heather Levien.

Eric Cheng named partner in Kirkland & Ellis

Alumnus Eric Cheng (EECS B.S. and B.S.  Business Administration, Haas, 2007) was promoted to partner in the Palo Alto and San Francisco offices of Kirkland & Ellis LLP.   Eric's practice focuses on intellectual property disputes in federal district courts around the country as well as before the U.S. International Trade Commission, with an emphasis on patent and  copyright infringement, and trade secret misappropriation, involving a wide range of technologies.

Prof. Tsu-Jae King Liu and Prof. Claire Tomlin

Tsu-Jae King Liu and Claire Tomlin receive CITRIS Athena Award

Professors Tsu-Jae King Liu and Claire Tomlin have been selected to receive the inaugural Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS) Athena Awards for Women in Technology for Academic Leadership. This award was established to recognize the accomplishments of technology leaders and organizations fostering interest in computer science for the next generation of women and girls. Prof. King Liu was previously the Chair of EECS, Associate Dean for Research and Associate Dean for Academic Planning, and was elected to the Intel Board of Directors in July and named Vice Provost for Academic and Space Planning in September. For the past 2 years, Prof. Tomlin has developed and led a summer program for Girls in Engineering, which has served more than 200 students from 60 Bay Area schools. She is a pioneer in hybrid systems for collision avoidance and avionics safety, as well as applications in other domains such as military operations, business strategies, and power grid control.  She has won numerous awards and honors.

Gene Luen Yang wins MacArthur Genius' Grant

EECS alumnus Gene Luen Yang (CS B.A. '95) has been selected for a MacArthur fellowship, one of the most prestigious prizes in the United States.   Awarded for exceptional “originality, insight and potential,” a MacArthur prize comes with a no-strings-attached grant of $625,000 distributed over five years.  In January, Gene became the first graphic novelist named national ambassador for children’s literature by the Library of Congress.