Frequently Asked Questions about the L&S Computer Science Major

Questions

Prospective Students

  1. I am planning a visit. How do I make the most out of my visit?

  2. What major requirements are fulfilled by AP credits?

  3. As a prospective transfer student, what classes should I take? What classes do I need to take when I arrive at UCB?

  4. I am applying to UC Berkeley, should I apply to EECS or CS?

CS Program Information for current UCB students

  1. How do I become a Computer Science Major?

  2. How do minors work? Do I get any enrollment priority?

  3. Can I change my major to EECS?/ Is CS a lesser major?/ How do I change my major to CS?

  4. What does petitioning/declaring mean? When will I be official and get enrollment priority?

  5. I want to declare a double major. What do I do?

  6. Can I declare early?

  7. Can I declare junior year and/or after 70 units?

  8. I have no programming experience. What classes can I take to better prepare me for CS61A?

  9. Can I take Math 55 instead of CS 70?

  10. Can I take CS 8 and CS 88 to declare CS?

  11. How do my grades in CS47A/B factor into my declaration gpa?

  12. Can I retake any of the prerequisite courses required to declare CS? How will that affect my chances of getting into the major?

  13. Can I pass/no-pass a prerequisite to declare CS?

  14. What EE requirements do I need to take?

  15. What do you consider a heavy workload?

  16. How do I check that a technical elective is approved?

  17. Can my technical electives fulfill L&S’s “upper division outside the major” requirement?

Enrollment Information

  1. Will course X be offered during Y semester? Who will be teaching it?

  2. I’m an L&S undeclared student. Should I be worried about getting into lower division CS classes?

  3. I just turned in my declaration form, but it won’t be processed until the end of the semester. I can’t Phase 1 any CS classes, what am I supposed to do?

  4. I want to enroll in more than 20.5 units. How do I get approval?

  5. How does enrollment work for the upper division in CS? AKA I’m a senior CS major and I still got waitlisted, what’s going on?

  6. Where do I find enrollment priorities for EE, CS, and EECS courses? Can I enroll in graduate courses?

  7. I’m not a CS major. How do I get into CS upper divs?

  8. I’m not a UC Berkeley student but I want to take CS classes. How do I enroll?

  9. I see open seats in the class but I’ve been wait listed – why?

  10. I’m a transfer student who is unable to enroll into classes – what should I do?

  11. I’m trying to enroll into a CS class but it won’t let me select the lab and/or discussion section that I want. What are 999 sections?

  12. How does CalCentral process the wait list?

  13. I want to enroll into a class that as a time conflict with another – what should I do?

  14. I’m pretty far down the wait list. What are my chances of getting into the CS class?

  15. How can I find enrollment updates about CS classes?

Advising Help

  1. When do I make an advising appointment and how?

  2. I need advising, who do I go talk to?

Internships & Research

  1. How can I get an internship? Where can I find helpful resources?

  2. I’m a junior, haven’t interned, and am not doing side projects.  How can I make myself more attractive?  Should I start independent projects now?  Hackathons?

  3. I need a signature for CPT, does my major advisor sign this?

Miscellaneous

  1. I’m graduating this semester. What do I need to do?

  2. My question is not on this list, what do I do?

Answers

Prospective Students

  1. I am planning a visit. How do I make the most out of my visit?
    1. Please see tips on what to do during your visit, e.g. sitting in on a lecture, department tours, and more.

    2. If you would like to meet with an advisor, we recommend scheduling an appointment via berkeleycs.youcanbook.me, as we may not be be available for drop-in appointments.

  2. What major requirements are fulfilled by AP credits?
    1. The only major requirements that may be waived using AP, A-Level or IB exam credit are Math 1A and Math 1B (see score requirements).

    2. AP credit can also be used to fulfill the university and college requirements. This is determined by the College of Letters & Sciences; the information can be found by clicking through the various requirements.

  3. As a prospective transfer student, what classes should I take? What classes do I need to take when I arrive at UCB?
    1. Students should take recommended courses on this website or as detailed on assist.org for California Community College students. Please make an appointment with an advisor for specific questions.

    2. UC does not maintain articulation agreements from any four-year institutions or community colleges outside of California. A student would be responsible for finding courses that they believe are equivalent to those taken by our first and second year CS students. See the College and campus requirements. The additional requirements that should be completed before matriculation are:

      • one year calculus (UCB Math 1A & 1B)

      • differential equations and linear algebra (UCB Math 54)

      You can use guide.berkeley.edu to try to determine what you think might be the closest equivalent courses at your institution.

  4. I am applying to UC Berkeley, should I apply to EECS or CS?
    1. At the time of applying to UC Berkeley, students must indicate whether they are applying to EECS (in College of Engineering) or to the College of Letters & Science as an intending Computer Science major. Unfortunately, it is not possible to transfer into EECS after admission.

    2. Technical requirements in EECS and CS are almost identical, however general education requirements and the admissions processes vary significantly. The main difference in the two majors is what other subjects you would like to explore.

      • If you prefer greater flexibility in your coursework, or have an interest double-majoring in a non-engineering field, then the CS major in L&S might be a good choice. There is greater opportunity to explore other departments, such as economics, statistics, cognitive science, and music.

      • If you have an interest in electrical engineering, or have an interest in double-majoring in another engineering major, the EECS major in COE may be better suited for you.

    3. For more detailed information about the differences between the EECS and CS majors, see the comparison chart.


CS Program Information for current UCB students

  1. How do I become a Computer Science Major?
    1. If you were admitted to UC Berkeley Fall 2015 or later:

      • Complete these prerequisites: CS 61A, CS 61B, CS 70

      • Earn a 3.3 GPA in those prerequisites

        • Only courses taken at UC Berkeley count toward the GPA calculation

      • Complete declaration application before the 30th day of the last month of the semester in which you complete your prerequisites (Dec 30, May 30, or Aug 30)

    2. If you were admitted to UC Berkeley before Fall 2015:

      • Complete these prerequisites: Math 1A, Math 1B, Math 54, CS 61A, CS 61B, CS 61C, CS 70

      • Earn a 3.0 GPA in those prerequisites

        • Only courses taken at UC Berkeley count toward the GPA calculation

      • Complete declaration application before the 30th day of the last month of the semester in which you complete your prerequisites (Dec 30, May 30, or Aug 30).

  2. How do minors work? Do I get any priority? How do I get into classes? How do I declare my minor?
    1. See information on applying to the CS minor and information on applying to the EECS minor. These programs are open to any students, regardless of their college.

    2. CS Minors do not receive enrollment priority for our classes. Many students pursuing the minor are able to enroll, they just have to be flexible and patient.

    3. We do offer some CS upper-division course during the summer. In the past we have offered: CS 160, 162, and 188. Enrollment is first-come, first-served.

    4. Courses that some minors have had success getting into include CS 164, CS 184, and to some extent, CS 170 and CS 188 (depending on demand).

  3. Can I change my major to EECS?/ Is CS a lesser major?/ How do I change my major to CS?
    1. The College of Engineering is not accepting change of college applications for the EECS major.

    2. If you are already in the College of Engineering, you may apply for a change of major. See a fully detailed list of requirements to apply for a change of major.

    3. The CS major in the College of Letters & Sciences (L&S) is by no means a “lesser major”. The main difference between CS and EECS are mainly the non-major requirements like breadth and electives. CS courses that EECS & CS students take are taught by the same faculty and do not differ in curriculum.

    4. If you would like to switch into the CS major from another major within L&S, you will have to meet the requirements.

  4. What does petitioning/declaring mean? When can I declare? When will I get enrollment priority?
    1. Petitioning/declaring means that you are submitting your application to declare yourself as a Computer Science major. After grades are available to advisors (which is after you can see them on CalCentral), it usually takes about two to three weeks to process your application and update your status on CalCentral. You will receive an email from advisors when your application has been processed. Application here: https://deptapps.eecs.berkeley.edu/csapp/apply

    2. You can apply for the major any time during the term of your last prerequisite. This means that if you are completing your prerequisites this semester, you can submit your paperwork any time by the 30th of the last month of the semester (December 30th, May 30th, or August 30th). Your will receive CS enrollment priority as you are declared in the major (as soon as it shows up on CalCentral).

  5. I want to declare a double major, what do I do?
    1. Complete paperwork:

      1. If you’re already declared as another major, complete the packet*, obtain signature from other major advisor

      2. If you’re undeclared, complete the packet* (signatures are not needed)

    2. When filling out the online CS application, upload the corresponding paperwork.

    3. CS major advisors will sign and return if you’re accepted to the major.

    4. Meet with your other major for signatures as needed.

    5. Make an appointment with L&S for approval and declaration.

    *See link to determine whether you are declaring a double-major or a simultaneous degree. It will affect which packet you will need to fill out. If you need help filling out the packet, please make an appointment with your college advisor.

  6. Can I declare early?

    Early declaration is applicable only for students who matriculated before Fall 15.

    • You can declare early if you will only be missing one of your seven prerequisite course after grades are released in the semester that you submit your application, and you have above a 3.4 technical GPA in the prerequisite courses you have grades for (all but the one).

  7. Can I declare junior year and/or after 70 units?
    1. It is still possible to declare, provided you can still graduate on time, but your registration will likely be blocked with a hold shortly after you exceed 70 units and are still undeclared.  To remove the hold, you’ll need to complete the Conditions to Declare and Program Planning forms and make an appointment with a CS advisor (see Q.9) to obtain a signature. For questions about registration holds and declaration timelines, please contact the College of Letters & Sciences.

    2. Please be proactive in meeting with Advisers. We strongly encourage students to meet with us early on and often to create a plan to declare and complete the major. If you do need the form filled out, fill everything out that you possibly can so we can spend our time strategizing your program plan as opposed to filling out paperwork.

  8. I have no programing experience. What classes can I take to better prepare me for CS61A?

    No worries!! Many of our current CS majors had no prior programming experience. We recommend students to take either CS C8 or CS10:

    • CS C8 will give you lots of programming experience in python, which is used in CS61A

    • CS10 will introduce you to some of the bigger concepts taught in CS61A, but will use mostly use SNAP! And later Python.

    • For more information, check out the “Alternatives” section

  9. Can I take Math 55 instead of CS 70?
    1. We only allow Math 55 as a substitute for CS 70 for students who complete majors both CS, and either Applied or Pure Math. There are very few exceptions, and only for extenuating circumstances. Please fill out an Exception Form to request for approval of an exception. Exceptions are reviewed by our Vice Chair.

    2. Students pursuing the CS minor may not use Math 55 in place of CS 70. Students who completed math 55 and wish to skip CS 70 should enroll in EECS 47F. To do so, please contact the CS 70 instructors.

  10. Can I take CS 8 and CS 88 to declare CS?
    1. CS C8 + CS 88 can be used to prepare students for CS 61B.

    2. CS C8 + CS 88 is not sufficient for declaring/completing CS or EECS majors. Students must also take CS 47A after they've completed CS 88.

    3. If a student takes CS  C8 + CS 88 + CS 47A and attempts to declare CS (discouraged), those grades will not be used to compute their GPA for major admission. Students intending to major in CS should instead take CS 61A.

  11. How do my grades in CS47A/B factor into my declaration gpa?
    1. CS 47A grades do not count toward declaration

    2. CS 47B grades count for 1 unit toward declaration

  12. Can I retake any of the prerequisite courses required to declare CS? How will that affect my chances of getting into the major?
    1. As per campus policy, students are only allowed to repeat courses in which they received a D+, D, D-, F, or NP.

    2. If 1st attempt at course was before Spring 2017:

      • Higher grade will be used for CS application

      For example, 1st attempt: CS61A (Fall 2016) - “F”, 2nd attempt: CS61A (Spring 2017) - “A”, grade used for CS application will be an “A”

    3. If 1st attempt at course was Spring 2017 and after:

      • Both grades for that course are used for CS application

      For example, 1st attempt: CS61A (Spring 2017) - “F”, 2nd attempt: CS61A (Fall 2017) - “A”, grade used for CS application will be a “C”

  13. Can I pass/no-pass a prerequisite to declare CS?
    1. All CS requirements must be taken for a letter grade. P/NP-ing a prereq makes you ineligible for the major.

    2. For information about receiving a no-pass (NP), see #12 above.

  14. What EE requirements do I need to take?
    1. If admitted before Fall 2017 must choose one of the following options:

      • EE 16A and EE 16B

      • Math 54 and EE 16A

      • Math 54 and EE 16B

        • Will need to self-study circuits material taught in EE 16A to prepare of EE 16B

    2. If admitted Fall 2017 or after must choose from the following options:

      • EE 16A and EE 16B

      • Math 54 and EE 16B

        • Will need to self-study circuits material taught in EE 16A to prepare of EE 16B

    3. For more information and advice, see the Lower Division Requirements page.

  15. What do you consider a heavy workload?
    1. Please review “workload” section at the bottom of the CS Major Upper Division Degree Requirements page.

    2. If you would like input about a specific schedule, oftentimes, the best people to ask are your peers who have direct experience; we recommend that you first review posts on the  Course Advice Facebook page or the EECS 101 Piazza page (label as peer-directed). If you would like an advisor’s input, please make an appointment with one of our advisors (see the Advising section).

      • Students interested in taking 3 or more technicals together should make an appointment with an advisor because we strongly advise against this.

  16. How do I check that an upper division technical elective is approved?
    1. Consult the approved technical elective course list

    2. To request an evaluation of a course to be added to this list, please submit a request. Please first check if a course has already been reviewed.

  17. Can my technical electives fulfill L&S’s “upper division outside the major” requirement?

    Questions about the College requirements are always best answered by their advising office. However, they have historically accepted technical electives from other departments, and upper division EE courses to fulfill this requirement.

Enrollment Information

  1. Will course X be offered during Y semester? Who will be teaching it?

    See the Courses page on our website to view upcoming schedules for CS, EE, and EECS classes. You may also visit classes.berkeley.edu. We keep our schedules as accurate as possible, but please note that schedules are subject to change.

  2. I’m an L&S undeclared. Should I be worried about getting into lower division CS classes?
    • In general, no. First and second year students who are undeclared in L&S or CoE, as well as declared EECS students, have priority through the end of phase 2.

    • We recommend that you stay undeclared until you finish the CS major prerequisites, because once you’ve declared a major that is not Computer Science, you will lose this priority.

    • For more information, see “Getting into CS Courses”.

  3. I just turned in my declaration, but it won’t be processed until the end of the semester. I can’t Phase I any upper division CS classes, what am I supposed to do?
    1. This is normal. Consider taking any outstanding lower division requirements (CS 61C, EE 16A & B, Math 54).

    2. You need at least 7 units of upper division technical electives for the major.  You can enroll for any of those that appear on our pre-approved list.

    3. You can use up to 19 units of EE or EECS courses for the CS major, these can be enrolled in during phase I.  

      • Here’s a list of EE courses that you might wish to take after EE 16A/B and CS 70:

        • EE 120, 121, 123, 125, 126, 127, 128

    4. Please see the EECS 101 Piazza page and “Getting into CS Courses” for enrollment updates. For more information, see question 24 below.

  4. I want to enroll in more than 20.5 units. How do I get approval?
    1. These requests are not considered until the third week of courses. You should attend the first couple of weeks of all the classes you wish to take.

    2. If you are undeclared, you should schedule an appointment with an L&S Advisor via Cal Central

    3. If you are declared, submit your proposed schedule.

  5. How does enrollment work for upper division CS courses? I’m a senior CS major and I still got waitlisted, what’s going on?
    1. In Phase I, declared L&S CS and EECS majors will be able to enroll in these classes, assuming space exists. Non-majors will be able to be put themselves on the waitlist.

    2. At the end of Phase II, any UC student can put themselves on the waitlist.

    3. When the adjustment period begins, any UC Berkeley student will be enrolled as space allows, starting from the beginning of the existing waitlist.

    4. A few upper division courses will initially allow no more than 70% of projected enrollment capacity until sufficient TA support is hired. (In F18, this applies only applies to CS 160/260A and CS 186.)

    5. If you’re declared and waitlisted for upper division CS courses during phase I you may:

      • Enrolling in a course that has already hit 70% enrollment.

      • Enrolling in a course but already have hit the upper unit limit for the enrollment phase.

  6. Where do I find enrollment priorities for EE, CS, and EECS courses? Can I enroll in graduate courses?
    1. The enrollment priorities can be found here for CS, EE, and EECS courses.

    2. You may enroll in graduate courses under the discretion of the professor. Students are encouraged to speak with the professor to get approval. Once granted approval, the instructor will need to communicate with CS Scheduler or the EE Scheduler so that the student may be enrolled. See question 2a in the "Advising Help" section below for their emails.

  7. I’m not a CS major. How do I get into CS upper divs?
    1. Waitlist yourself for CS upper-division classes. During the adjustment period, major and class standing will no longer be accounted for in waitlist processing, and enrollment will be done in waitlist order.

    2. Consider summer session. There are no enrollment priorities over the summer term.

    3. If you have applied for the major, once you are declared, the enrollment system will automatically process you as a declared major. If your declaration is processed prior to the adjustment period and there are open seats in the class, you will bypass non-majors on the wait list and be enrolled – no further action is required on your part.

    4. For more information, see “Getting into CS Courses”.

  8. I’m not a UC Berkeley student but I want to take UC Berkeley CS/EE/EECS classes. How do I enroll?
    1. This is called concurrent enrollment and occurs through UC Berkeley Extension.

    2. In order for concurrent enrollment students to be enrolled in a class, there must be no UC Berkeley students on the waitlist.

      • For CS classes, concurrent enrollment applications won't process until week 2 of classes. This allows time for our best efforts to clear the wait lists of full-time UCB students.
  9. I see open seats in the class but I’ve been wait listed – why?

    Reserve capacities (aka Reserve Caps) – allow us to set aside seats for specific student populations. These caps remain in effect until the Adjustment Period begins. During the Adjustment Period, unused reserved seats will be released and the wait list is process processed in sequential order. Neither major status nor class standing will impact enrollment at this point.

  10. I’m a transfer student who is unable to enroll into classes – what should I do?

    Transfer Students - as well as first or second year undergraduates who have received community college units while in high school — who have difficulty enrolling should contact cs-enrollments@berkeley.edu.

  11. I’m trying to enroll into a CS class but it won’t let me select the lab and/or discussion section that I want.  What are 999 sections?

    999 sections – When enrolling into CS courses, enroll into the lecture and the associated 999 section(s) only.

    Selection and assignment into the actual section(s) will happen outside of CalCentral and varies by course. Some courses notify students prior to the first class, while others discuss section assignments during the first lecture. After enrollment, the best recommendation is to wait for the instructor to provide additional information about section assignments and to make sure you attend the first lecture.

    For planning purposes, you can see the action section information on classes.berkeley.edu even though you cannot select those sections during enrollment on CalCentral.

  12. How does CalCentral process the wait list?

    Once enrollment opens, Campus Solutions (the enrollment system) processes wait lists four times daily at 6:30am, 12:30pm, 6:30pm, and 12:30am.

    During Phases 1 and 2: The wait list is processed in sequential order according to reserve caps associated with each course. Students who are further down the wait list and meet the reserve cap requirements will be enrolled (assuming there is space in the sections) before students higher on the wait list who do NOT meet the reserve cap requirements.

    During the Adjustment period: The wait list is processed in sequential order – no preference is given to EECS or CS majors because reserve caps have come down.

         Example: CS 188 has 13 open seats and a wait list

         Joe, an undeclared L&S student holds position 12 on the wait list.

         Tina, a declared EECS major holds position 20 on the wait list.

         During Phases 1 & 2, Tina will be enrolled and Joe will remain on the wait list because he doesn’t meet the reserve cap requirements.

         During Adjustment period: Joe is enrolled into the class and Tina remains on the wait lilst because the wait list is processed in sequential order. Since reserve caps are no longer active, no priority is given to EECS majors.

    Caution: Although time conflicts will no longer prevent students from enrolling into EECS classes, other problems WILL. If you are wait listed for a class and see open seats or are not moving up the wait list, check the following:

    •         Make sure you have enough units available to enroll into the class without exceeding the upper unit limit for the phase.  (Phase 1 = 13.5, Phase 2 = 17.5, and Adjustment Period = 20.5)
  13. I want to enroll into a class that as a time conflict with another – what should I do?

    Beginning with the F18 semester, EE and CS classes have been set up in Cal Central to allow time conflicts. (No more having to submit a request or complete the Google form!)

    However, even though CalCentral will allow enrollment into time conflicted EE and CS classes, it is still your responsibility to plan your schedule carefully. Departments and faculty are NOT required or expected to accommodate students’ schedule conflicts (including midterms and finals). The Instructor of Record may decline to enroll or Instructor-Drop a student from a class if they cannot be present for all schedule activities, including midterms and finals.

    Best practice is to check attendance policies for each class and to speak to the instructors before enrolling in time conflicted classes.

    Time Conflicts and Wait list Processing

    Students who enroll into a time-conflicted class that is full will be placed on the wait list. What's new is that students with time conflicts will now be processed the same as students without time conflicts.

    If you are waitlisted for a class that has a time conflict and are not moving up the wait list or into the class, it is because you do not meet a reserve cap requirement or you do not have sufficient units available to allow you to be enrolled without going over the unit limit for the phase.

  14. I’m pretty far down the wait list. What are my chances of getting into the CS class?

    It really depends on the instructor, the GSI hiring budget, and the demand for the class. Instructors work hard to enroll as many students as they possibly can from the wait list but it doesn’t always mean that you will get in. We expand classes as budget and space allow throughout the adjustment period and through the add/drop period.

    A good rule of thumb is to expect about 10% of enrolled students to drop during the add/drop period. That said, there are no guarantees you will make it into a class and it is ALWAYS a good idea to have a backup plan.

  15. How can I find enrollment updates about CS classes?

    To see semester-specific enrollment information and FAQs, sign up for the EECS 101 section of piazza.com. Relevant posts are pinned and you can also use the search bar.

Advising Help

  1. When do I make an advising appointment and how?
    1. Simple questions can be emailed or answered during drop-in office hours: currently Wednesdays 10am - 12pm and 1-4pm. Subject to change.

    2. Please make an appointment to discuss the following:

      • Workload/course selection

      • Enrollment troubleshoot

      • Not doing as well in classes as he/she thought (academic difficulty)

      • Specific questions about undergraduate research or internships

      • Appeals

      • Confirm you’re close to graduating from the CS major

  2. I need advising, who do I go talk to?
    1. I have questions about getting into classes, waitlists, etc.

    2. I have questions about the CS/EECS major, program planning, internships, research, etc

    3. I have questions about breadth requirements, withdrawal, picking a major

    4. I have questions about EECS grad school programs at Cal

Internships & Research

  1. How can I get an internship?
    1. The best way to get an internship would be to apply broadly to jobs that are of interest to you to increase your chances of getting an interview.

    2. Create a resume. Check out the Career Center website and/or UPE office hours (346 Soda) for resume critique and mock interviews. Many student groups also provide Professional Development events such as resume workshops and tips for interviews.

    3. Fill out your handshake profile.

    4. Attend info-sessions/tech talks.  These are recruiting events where companies will send their engineers and recruiters to collect resumes, talk about what it’s like there, etc. Infosessions/tech talks are all listed on the EECS homepage/monitors on the 3rd and 4th floors of Soda, and the 2nd floor of Cory. They are also listed on the EECS department calendar.

    5. Go to the Career Fairs: https://career.berkeley.edu/fairs/fairs.stm

    6. After getting an invitation for an interview, study and practice, practice, practice some more! Schedule mock interviews with UPE or the Career Center. To study for interviews, a good book to read is Cracking the Coding Interview by Gayle McDowell, which has many practice problems similar to interview questions. In addition, there are websites that can help you practice such as: https://www.hackerrank.com ; http://www.careercup.com and https://www.topcoder.com . The material covered in most CS interviews include data structures and algorithms, which are the focus of CS 61B and CS 170.

    7. If you don't get an internship, that’s okay, there are lots of ways to build relevant experience. Some options include: volunteering, taking summer classes, contributing to open-source projects, or creating your own personal project are some options.

  2. I’m a junior, haven’t interned, and am not doing side projects.  How can I make myself more attractive?  Should I start independent projects now?  Hackathons?
    1. What are you interested in? Why did you decide to major in Computer Science?

      There are many clubs in and outside of the department that cater to different interests that may relate to Computer Science. Some examples are:

    2. Or attend a hackathon hosted by various clubs (CSUA, Hackers@Berkeley, UPE, Blueprint). Try to find a team, and come up with an idea. If you can’t find a team, often you can still attend as an observer.

    3. Go to an external Hackathon (Cal Hacks, PennApps, etc.): There are many hackathons hosted in various parts of the United States. Many of them reimburse you for travel fees.

    4. If you’re not sure what you’re interested in, you should review class projects you enjoyed and look more deeply into them. Many of them are an introduction to a specific field/area in computer science. Visit a professor’s office hours and ask about how you can learn more about it.

  3. I need a signature for CPT, does my major advisor sign this?

EE and CS Curricular Practical Training information

Miscellaneous

  1. I’m graduating this semester. What do I need to do?
    1. Review the College’s graduation instructions

    2. You should be automatically added to the degree list during your your 8th semester (4th if a transfer student). Please check for “Expected Graduation” under your picture in Cal Central. If you don’t see a date, you can add yourself on the degree list though your college. If you’re graduating early or late, you will need to address this!

    3. Ensure that you have met all the degree requirements as listed here and here.

      • It’s suggested that your meet with an Advisor for each of your majors, and your college to ensure completion. You should do this with enough time to change your class schedule if you find out you’re missing a requirement.

    4. Register for commencement if you want to attend. There are 2 commencement ceremonies. You can choose to attend both, one, or neither:

      • General, campus-wide commencement is held every December and May. Students’ names are not announced. More info here.

      • Departmental commencement for your major is only held in spring. Students cross the stage and their name is read. More info here.

    5. Preserve your email address if desired.

  2. My question is not on this list, what do I do?

    Please check the EECS 101 piazza, contact cs-advising@cs.berkeley.edu, or schedule an appointment!